Solidarity with GAZA

gaza

Dear people of FREE GAZA YOUTH!

It happened today that a kind friend sent us your manifesto. It has been 3 years since it was published. We are very late, but unfortunately everything is still very up-to-date, specially now, when the endless Israeli terror continues.

We are deeply touched by your manifesto and deeply disturbed about GAZA.

We feel that we can not just sit at home, watching the news,the anger is boiling within us, and from the hypocrisy of the international community, UN and EU our stomachs are rolling.

Some of us are desperate to the level that we can not stop thinking about the question; what is possible to do? The sense of powerlessness destroys us as, partly because the situation in our countries, and of course now about Gaza.
We share the wish to find a way how to direct this anger and energy into something
- as you wrote- what can challenge the status quo. Of course peacefully.

But we are not finding an effective non-violent way how to support you. WE had a protest for GAZA in Belgrade and Ljubljana together with our Palestinian brothers who currently live here, but those are just one of the many demonstrations all around the world, but in fact they are useless.

There was an idea to have more organized protests in front of the israeli embassy. Some people say – we don’t recognize the isreli state, it is occupied Palestine so we can not recognize any embassy as well. Others think that statement works just in theory. If the non-exiting Israeli state can send rockets and take lifes day by day for decades, we can’t just ignore their existence. By ignoring, paradoxically we would support it. From their point of view the embassy is the only presence of Izrael, so we should show our displeasure towards the izraeli policy and our solidarity with GAza and Palestine there.

We dont know if you will get our message at all, we can just try to imagine what do you face with at the moment there, but if you have any idea what could be done from this distance, please write us.

Shukran.

Stay strong!

Greetings of solidarity and resistance!

Youth of ex Yugoslavia

 

 

 

Posted in ZINE: Externalisation of EU migration politics

Report about the action in Debrecen

Here’s a report about action that took place at Debrecen/Hungary on 17th of May 2014, written by a participant from Vienna, combined with some reflection about the significance of protest and resistance against detention policies in Hungary within the struggle against European border- and deportation regime:

Protest against detention and its significance in the struggle against European border- and deportation regime

For several years, Hungarian asylum system has been unfamous for its practices of detaining refugees in closed prison camps or, on the other hand, throwing people on the street, without any place to stay. At Debrecen in the east of Hungary is located one of the biggest refugee camps in the country, with both open camp section and closed detention camp. Saturday, 17th of May 2014, Debrecen has been in the focus of bringing this systematic violation of freedom and basic human rights and also refugees’ resistance against this system to public attention: Around 50 people living in the open section of the camp, together with a group of Hungarian and international activists who came by bus from Budapest, organised by the group Migszol (Migrants Solidarity Group), came together for a protest rally in front of the refugee camp. Major demands: Stop of detention of refugees in Hungary, but also an end to bad living conditions and abuses taking place in open camps, too. People from the refugee camp and visitors from outside held speeches and shouted slogans for freedom, interrupted by music and dancing. From the entrance area of the open camp, the demonstration moved to a point opposite the outside walls of the closed detention camp, so that people inside this prison could see and hear it. Many of the prisoners, in turn, shouted and waved from inside – a moment of solidarity as well as of feeling helpless against the physical power of barbed wires and prison walls. For many of the people living in the open asylum camp, the detention section is not an unknown place: They have been inside detention at Debrecen or other camps, often for months, after being arrested by Hungarian border guards, after being deported to Hungary from other EU-countries based on Dublin-rule, or as a form of intimidation and punishment by the authorities. It is said that people with supposedly bad chances in the asylum trial are more likely to be detained, but in general, the descision of who will be sent to a closed camp is a totally arbitrary one, working as a threat upon all asylum seekers in Hungary. Many of the refugee protesters had stories to tell about their sad and cruel experiences inside detention camps at Debrecen and other places, like Nyírbator or Békéscaba: Stories about being systematically beaten and maltreated by prison guards, some of them showing traces of injuries on their bodies. Or stories about people psychologically traumatised and broken iside detention. While many refugees at Debrecen have experienced Dublin deportation to Hungary, often from Austria or Germany, it also became evident that at the same time, many people fear being deported out of Hungary, especially to Bulgaria, based on Dublin rule, too. Several people pointed out that in Bulgaria, like in Hungary, it is common for Asylum seekers to be detained, while those who are „free“ are left homeless on the streets, without any kind of accomodation or support from the Bulgarian state. This short day of protest, a day of joyful coming together, of rising up for freedom, but also of sharing harmful and traumatising experiences, ended with cordial farewell and confident motivation among the participants that further steps of protest need to follow.

Detention and push back

In the beginning of 2013, the practice of detaining asylum seekers was limitted by modifications of Hungarian law, meaning that people applying for asylum immediately after being picked up by Hungarian border police, as well as people being deported to Hungary based on Dublin rule, should not be detained any more. Anyhow, detention as a common standard was reintroduced only on 1st of July 2013, introducing a form of detention that is legally different from deportation custody and allows Hungarian authorities to imprison asylum seekers up to 6 months. This new law, which concerns people who were arrested inside Hungarian borders as well as those deported there from other EU countries, offers very different justifications of detention: Among others „Verifying someone’s identity“, „suspicion of delaying the asylum procedure“, „not fulfilling duties of asylum procedure“ or generally „protection of public order and national security“. In daily practices of Hungarian asylum system, this means that refugees in Hungary live with the permanent threat of being sent to a closed detention camp for any arbitrary excuse. Many times, people imprisoned in Hungarian detention centers have complained about extremely bad living conditions, insufficient food and medical treatment and violent abuses. Several times, refugees have responded against this detention system in collective acts of resistance: In August 2013, people started a hunger strike at Nyírbator detention center and in November 2013, a prison riot took place at Békéscaba. Due to inhumane living conditions and pressure from the authorities, many have chosen a so-called „voluntary“ pushback to Serbia as the only exit option seemingly available to them. At the same time, forced deportation to Serbia, which is not part of the EU Dublin regulation, also seem to be common, like stated in a testimony by a participant of Békéscaba riot: „(…) During this period I had seen that they deported people who had been there for four months (from Pakistan, Algeria, and other countries). They [the wardens, the police] would just come, without informing them before and deporting them the same night or the early morning of the next day. The people were angry that they just deport us back. We came to seek asylum and they would just push us back to Serbia.(…)“

Countries at eastern periphery of EU serving as „prison camp“ within Dublin-system

While it is an important challenge to struggle for the stop of Dublin deportations to Hungary because of the danger of detention, it also has to be pointed out that detention is not simply a specific failure of Hungarian asylum system. Closed detention camps in Hungary are set up and maintained with money from the EU and certain member states, like Germany. In this sense, an EU banner can be seen waving over the entrance doors of camps in Nyírbator, Debrecen and other places. Detaining asylum seekers is not something Hungarian state does against common EU human rights standards, but something it does to fulfil its role within EU migration regime. Deportations based on Dublin rule and the imprisonment of migrants and refugees in detention centers are corresponding parts of the system of repression against the free movement of people. With the breakdown of Greek asylum system, which has forced the EU member states to stop Dublin deportations to Greece, other countries at the periphery of the EU are more and more in the position to replace the role of Greece as buffer states. And Hungary is not the only state whose institutions actively try to fulfil this role: Bulgarian state, for example, also has become unfamous for the detention of asylum seekers and transit migrants. Even in Hungary, with all the atrocities of its own asylum system, refugees talk about their fear of getting Dublin deportation to Bulgaria. This is not only because of the threat of detention, but also because of the total lack of accomodation and basic vital support for those people who are not detained and because of frequent racist attacks. And even in those states which are no EU members yet, steps are made to get more actively involved in the repressive European border regime. Serbian authorities, according to observations by activists living there, are presently preparing to introduce systematic detention of refugees and „irregular“ migrants, too. Detention, push backs and other forms of movement restriction, with all its cruel consequences for the lives of people, are, to a large extent, caused by the policy of rich central EU countries like Germany and Austria. These states, until now, have been the most active ones to implement and to extend the Dublin – by now Dublin III – system in Europe, aiming to keep „unwanted“ people outside their own borders at any price. At the same time, this interest corresponds to the racist anti-refugee/anti-migrant agenda of right wing and fascist groups and parties who have become increasingly powerful in Hungary, but also in other countries. Globally, the extension of detention push backs and generally repressive migration control in the countries of eastern Europe and the Balkans is also due to their geographic position as transit countries into the EU for people fleeing from the war zones in Asia and Africa as well as for others searching for a better life. And, not least, from eastern and southeastern Europe itself, people who are facing economic crisis, poverty and racist persecution are setting out towards richer western EU countries. With the latest escalation of the horrors of war in Syria, Iraq, Pakistan and other parts of the world, one of the major concerns for European bureaucrats and mainstream media is how to „handle“ and control the expected rise of the numbers of refugees. Media in Austria or Germany are full of „alarming“ reports about allegedly „exploding“ numbers of Asylum seekers – numbers in fact ridiculously small compared to people who are blocked in refugee camps in Africa or Asia -, while the EU members’ role in plundering resources, supporting oppressive regimes and inflicting wars keeps being ignored. In this context, detention, pushbacks and (Dublin) deportations along the flight- and migration routes through eastern Europe are tools of the same ruthless asylum- and migration control regime implemented by the member states of the EU that kills people in the Mediterranean- and Agean sea and in the deserts of northern Africa. Thus, delegitimating, undermining and saboting these tools of repression is a fight for freedom of movement that can contribute to remove barriers for people’s possibilities to save their lives and to claim access to the resources that are denied for them in a capitalist world system.

Marginal position of refugee solidarity protests in the context of rising nationalism and fascism

On the day of anti detention protest in Debrecen, local Jobbik fascists, one of them a deputy at Hungarian parliament, held a counter rally to intimidate the refugee solidarity action and, as they said, to „support the Hungarian government“ and „protect the local population“. Although no physical confrontations happened, this incident is typical for the marginal position of refugee- and migrant solidarity in Hungarian society: No person from Debrecen who is not an inhabitant of the refugee camp showed her solidarity. The only ones presently supporting refugees’ demands for freedom and basic rights seem to be some activist- and NGO groups mostly from Budapest, while Jobbik, with their fascist and often violent racist ideology, have become one of the most powerful political parties in Hungary. This, too, is not an exclusively Hungarian problem, but fits into the rise of fascist and other rightwing and racist groups almost everywhere in Europe.

Debrecen protest as a step for new cooperations and visibility of struggles

The demonstration in Debrecen on 17th of May has not been the only and not the first example of asylum seekers protesting against detention and social exclusion in Hungarian refugee camps. Riots and hunger strikes have take place at Bekescaba and Nyirbator. Of a new quality was, on the one hand, the cooperation between inhabitants of a refugee camp raising their voice and supporting groups from outside and, on the other hand, the high attention and visibility in Hungarian media. In this sense, for refugee activists as well as for the Migszol group, the Debrecen protest day was a big success, though it was clear to the organisers that substantial changes of inhumane living conditions are not likely to happen quickly. Future will show in how far refugees struggling against detention and deportation system and supporting groups will be able to build up a broader and more continuous protest movement and in how far they will have the power to resist against repression and intimidation by Hungarian authorities and racist groups. According to a report of Migszol, who visited Debrecen some weeks after the public demonstration, refugees continue to struggle against desperate living conditions, often using their bodies as the only tool available: there were people who went on hunger strike or sewed their mouth, in most cases far from any media attention. Internationally, the protest against detention system in Hungary is a highly important point of reference in the struggle against deportation through Dublin rule. In the case of Greece, Dublin deportations have already been suspended due to the all too obvious inhumane conditions of Greek asylum system, but only after visible scandalisation through protests, revolts, media reports and exemplary juridical cases. Also for Hungary, Bulgaria and other „target countries“ of Dublin deportations, there have been successful individual court cases of people who claimed their right to stay in another EU country. But still, authorities and courts in Austria, Germany etc. strictly refuse a general suspension of Dublin deportations, as this would put their strategies of refusing entry to refugees at stake. Achieving this would be a strategic goal in the struggle for freedom of movement in Europe. In Hungary and elsewhere, active refugees and migrants are the ones who are in the most exposed, most risky position within this struggle. It’s a challenge to participate in breaking isolation to make it successful.

Posted in articles

Solidarity with resisting refugees in Berlin-Kreuzberg

tumblr_n7toh5inYV1shmplio1_1280

„You can’t evict a movement!”
Solidarity with the refugee movement worldwide
Solidarity with the refugees in Berlin-Kreuzberg – challenging the real face
behind the smile of the (local) politicians

posted by Karawane/ Germany                                                                            http://thecaravan.org/node/4127

Why our brothers and sisters are under siege by around 1000 police for more than one week and a final attack is announced to come very soon? The brutality of the police in oppressing political resistance in Germany has a long history. How far it will go this time? Why the district ruling green party implemented a state of emergency in four streets around the area where the abandoned school is based? Why nobody is allowed to move in this area? Why inhabitants, shop owners and workers have to prove their identities and get officers at their side to reach their apartment or working place? Why freedom of press is suspended and the public is blindfolded about what happens behind the fences and inside the building? Everything possible to defame and to criminalize the refugees can be presented later on. You want to echo what happened in the case of Oury Jalloh after killing him?

For how long you will close your ears to the voices of the refugees?

The refugee activists on the roof of one school in Germany’s capital gave their answer on a sheet: „You can’t evict a movement“.

The refugee movement is everywhere, like in Berlin, Hannover (“Stop killing refugees”) or Hamburg (“We are here to stay”). It is already a long history of resisting and dying under a growing and highly sophisticated system of human right abuses, isolation and deportation, and the same long history of undermining self-determination and self-organization by NGOs, churches, politicians and alleged supporters. The refugee takes it all and continues to fight for justice – right now on the roof edge of the abandoned school building in Berlin. Is this what democracy looks like so that everyone gets this message from Berlin-Kreuzberg clear?

In 2003 Umberto Bossi, then leader of the rightwing party Northern League, declared in the aftermath of an earlier drowning disaster of boat peoples, “I want to hear the roar of canon! The immigrants must be hunted down, for better or worse! At the second or third warning – boom! Fire the canons at them! Otherwise this will never stop!” Today in Berlin-Kreuzberg the politicians in charge (here the green party*) you be on the same position only with a different rhetoric and a different party background?

What is your real position in the frame of Europe’s elimination system towards people who fled to this continent because Europe is engaged in their home countries like Ivory Coast, Sudan, Libya, Niger, Mali or Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan? Wars, warmongering, military coups, to maintain the business with highest profit rates are producing refugees day by day. When the victims of these policies turn towards Europe the hunt against them starts by all means and if it’s not the roaring canon than it’s pushing back in the deserts, piling the boats, gunshot or beaten to death at the borders. And inside the borders of the fortress of so called human rights and democracy there is nothing different in general than to eliminate the evidences of all these crimes by isolating people in the Lagers, by preparing for their deportation, by putting them in prison, by denying the basic rights to get a high risk to die because of the lack of means to survive and to stay healthy, by planting pain, traumata and sickness into the next generation.

Who can live with it?

We call on all refugees to critically rethink and strengthen our networks in our communities and act together.

Germany, 2nd July 2014

 

 

Posted in articles

Protest against detention and deportation system/ Debrecen- Hungary

For several years, Hungarian asylum system has been infamous for its practices of detaining refugees in closed prison camps or, on the other hand, throwing people on the street, without any place to stay. At Debrecen in the east of Hungary is located one of the biggest refugee camps in the country, with both open camp section and closed detention camp. Saturday, 17th of May 2014, Debrecen has been in the focus of bringing this systematic violation of freedom and basic human rights and also refugees’ resistance against this system to public attention: Around 50 people living in the open section of the camp, together with a group of Hungarian and international activists who came by bus from Budapest, came together for a protest rally in front of the refugee camp. Major demands: Stop of detention of refugees in Hungary, but also an end to bad living conditions and abuses taking place in open camps, too. Again and again, people from the refugee camp and the visitors from outside held speeches and shouted slogans for freedom, interrupted by music and dancing. The most touching moment was when the demonstration moved to a point opposite the outside walls of the closed detention camp, so that people inside this prison could see and hear it. Many of the prisoners, in turn, shouted and waved from inside – a moment of solidarity as well as of helplessness against the physical power of barbed wires and prison walls. For many of the people living in the open asylum camp, the detention section is not an unknown place: They have been inside detention at Debrecen or other camps, often for months, after being arrested by Hungarian border guards, after being deported to Hungary from other EU-countries based on Dublin-rule, as a form of intimidation and punishment by the authorities. It is said that people with supposedly bad chances in the asylum trial are more likely to be detained, but in general, the decision of who will be sent to a closed camp is a totally arbitrary one, working as a threat upon all asylum seekers in Hungary. Many of the refugee protesters had stories to tell about their sad and cruel experiences inside detention camps at Debrecen and other places, like Nyírbator or Békéscaba: Stories about being systematically beaten and maltreated by prison guards, some of them showing traces of injuries on their bodies. Or stories about people psychologically traumatized and broken inside detention. While many refugees at Debrecen have experienced Dublin deportation to Hungary, often from Austria or Germany, it also became evident that at the same time, many people fear being deported out of Hungary, especially to Bulgaria, based on Dublin-rule, too. Several people pointed out that in Bulgaria, like in Hungary, it is common for Asylum seekers to be detained, while those who are „free“ are left homeless on the streets, without any kind of accommodation or support from the Bulgarian state.

This short day of protest, a day of joyful coming together, of rising up for freedom, but also of sharing harmful and traumatising experiences, ended with cordial farewell and confident motivation among the participants that further steps of protest need to follow.

ACT AGAINST DETENTIONS AND DEPORTATIONS!                                                            ABOLISH DUBLIN!                                                                                                                                     NO BORDER, NO NATION!                                                                                                              UNITE AGAINST INJUSTICE!

                                                                                                       IMG_4901_800x533  IMG_4905_800x533 IMG_4922_800x480IMG_4927_800x533IMG_4909_800x533 IMG_4903_800x410

Posted in ZINE: Externalisation of EU migration politics

Refugees are helping local people in flooded parts of Serbia

10325790_10154139180515284_3573109115878033977_nhelpAsylum seekers from the camps of Banja Koviljaca and Bogovođa joined the actions of voluntary assist in the villages affected by floods. Groups of 35-50 migrants every day get up at 6am to repair the damages incurred by the swollen waters together with the villagers.

Disgusting rumors that asylum seekers receive money from the state for this volunteer work are completely insane and insulting human dignity. The local residents are grateful to asylum seekers on their willingness and given support.

http://www.prva.rs/web-tv/info/vesti/12060/vanredne-vesti-u-13h—21052014/35373/azilanti-pomazu-u-krupnju.html

srpski:

Tražioci azila pomažu lokalnom stanovništvu u poplavljenim delovima Srbije

helpTražioci azila iz Banje Koviljače i Bogovođe se volonterski priključuju akcijama da bi pomogli meštanima u selima zahvaćenim poplavama. Grupe od 35-50 migranata danima ustaju u 6 ujutro da bi zajedno sa lokalnim stanovnišvom sanirali štete koju je nanela nabujala voda.

Podmukle glasine da tražioci azila dobijaju novac od države za ovaj volonterski rad su potpuno sulude i vređaju ljudsko dostojanstvo. Lokalno stanovništvo je zahvalno tražiocima azila na njihovoj spremnosti i ukazanoj  pomoći.

 

Posted in ZINE: Externalisation of EU migration politics

Another peaceful protest and hunger strike of detainees in Harmondsworth Detention Centre / UK

Harmondsworth Detention Centre / UK

” Approximately 150 detainees are occupying the courtyard,                                                    sitting down in protest of the fast-track asylum system in which                                            individuals claiming asylum are placed immediately
in detention and held whilst their asylum cases are processed.                                           Protesters are refusing to eat and to move… “

more info:                                                                                                                       http://unitycentreglasgow.org/?p=1040

Posted in articles

Testimony: Detention in Lukavica- Bosnia / Deportation to Serbia

Testimony:

After a longer period of time we had spent in Serbia, we tried to
go further on to Croatia. Somehow we found ourselves in Bosnia. The
police got us. I don’t know where were we exactly. They took us to the
interrogation room. We had to tell them everything: how we left our
countries, how we traveled etc. They had told us that they would be
looking into whether we are entitled to obtain a refugee status. In
the meantime, we were to be sent to a refugee camp.

They took us to Sarajevo. We entered one two-storey building on
which I saw the EU flag. I didn’t know what this building represented
officially. I wondered if it could be the reception center, but in fact
it was a prison; we came to realize it as in this very place were kept
all the individuals without papers before being deported and those which
cases were labeled as undefined.
The system inside was the same one as in a prison, upgraded to European
standards: cameras, plasma screens, every Wednesday was the day for
clothes washing… When we arrived, we had to take off our clothes; they
took our phones, belts, money… It appeared to be clear that what would
most probably happen to us, was that we were going to be deported back to
Serbia in two weeks. They checked everything we had with ourselves that
could be used as evidence: serbian sim-cards, money, photos in the
phones… The law in Bosnia is: if you don’t have any evidence from the
country you are coming from, you cannot be deported back. However, it
implies to remain in prison for a longer period of time.
One of the rules is that before you leave the prison, you need to pay
the costs of your stay for the time you spent. We’ve been informed that
the cost of our stay equals to 30 euros per day and per person. Hence,
if they would find money on us, they would keep up to the total amount
and return the change.

Among the people I met, there were four Syrians with a little boy,
who were parked in the aisle reserved for families. They were deported
to Serbia after a while. I met two Pakistani boys, they had been kept
there for three months. Meanwhile they had sought for asylum and went
into an open camp. I met them after, in Serbia again. There were also
one older Croatian woman. She didn’t have papers when police controlled
her on the street. I don’t know why they didn’t let her go back in her
country or just let her free. For sure, she is not a threat for the society.
One boy form Djibouti was also there with us. He had all required
papers. He got a visa for Bosnia in Turkey. Right after he had landed in
Bosnia, he was arrested at the airport. They brought him to prison. He
had stayed two days with us; he had been deported back to Turkey right
after.
One pianist from Morocco was among us too. This boy had been here
for already one year and a half. He counted us a story about a riot
that happened there. One group of prisoners in desperation had
broken the windows, the plasma TV and had harmed themselves with razors.
After 6 months, all his friends were released, except him who was
accused of organizing the revolt.
An old man from Iraq had spent a longer period of time in prison. Five
years. He had been living in Bosnia for 13 years. He had a wife from
Bosnia and they had children together. I don’t know the reason for
keeping him in prison, but in all those years they didn’t bring him before the court.
There was also a man from Iran, he had already spent one year and a
half in this prison when I came across him. He had been a man with very
nice manners and had traveled a lot before. The prison had rendered him
crazy. There were times when he didn’t eat for two days. They filled him
up with pills… after all they are doing that with all the people
inside. He was laughing alone and with no apparent reason and was
terrified by the police. When he came out from his room he was repeating
— thank you, thank you, thank you — and made bows to the police. He
waited to be deported anywhere, but it hadn’t happened yet.

After three weeks spent there, nothing was happening. We asked
when they would deport us. We were answered that Serbia may refuse to
take us back, so we need to stay longer. We saw all those people who are inside for a longer time, so we decided to start a hunger strike. The same day, we refused to eat the food they gave us for lunch.
They ignored us. One Nigerian boy passed out and he went to the doctor.
The next day, the director of the prison came to talk with us. He said that there is no reason for any hunger strike, that the procedure is like this and that we need to stay there and wait for 30 days. He recommended us to wait 30
days; if nothing happened, we could decide if we want to continue with the strike. I felt myself responsible because I knew we were too weak to continue the strike. We would not hold out for long time. So, we didn’t have other choice then to trust this person.

After 30 days, they deported us. On the border, before the river,
the bosnian police contacted the serbian police. We waited for a long
time. I didn’t know where was the problem. In one moment, they said that
maybe they are going to send us back the same prisons. Nevertheless, we
went to Serbia. It was weird to observe the policemen how they are
greeting each other – in different uniforms but same faces. They handed us
over to the serbian police. The serbian police didn’t check anything,
there was no list with our names. We were afraid that they are going to
put us again in Padinska Skela and deport us back to Macedonia. We had
luck, they let us free and now we are again where we had started.

Some of our friends who stayed in prison are still there. They caught
us together, it would be logical to deport us back together too. Even
though the bosnian police had evidence that they had entered into the bosnian
territory from Serbia, they said that the serbian authorities don’t have
their names in the evidence. While they were bringing us out from the
cell, they told one boy that he will stay. Imagine what feeling it
must be when they are taking all your friends out and you are staying
alone in the prison – even though deportation is not the best thing, it can
happen to you. He didn’t even get the precise explanation why he had to
stay. He rebelled, security cameras filmed him, so they took him outside
and beated him up. We could hear his voice.

Today we called our friends that are still inside. They started a
hunger strike again. The same man who was telling us to be patient, came
to them again. He told them to stop the strike and that they would be deported in three days. Three days passed, but nothing happened.

serbian:

Svedočenje
Pritvor u Bosni i Hercegovini/ Deportacija nazad u Srbiju
 
Posle dužeg vremena provedenog u Srbiji odlučili smo da idemo dalje, u
Hrvatsku. Nekako smo dospeli u Bosnu i uhvatili su nas. Ne znam gde smo se
tačno nalazili. Poveli su nas na razgovor, morali smo ispričati sve. Kako
smo napustili našu zemlju, kako smo putovali itd. Objasnili su nam da će
razmotriti da li imamo prava na izbeglički status i da ćemo ići u izbeglički kamp.
Posle toga, prebacili su nas u Sarajevo. Ušli smo u jednu zgradu koja ima
dva sprata, video sam zastavu Evropske unije na njoj. Ne znam šta predstavlja
to mesto zvanično, verovatno je neka vrsta prihvatnog centra, ali u suštini je zatvor.
Posle smo saznali da je to mesto gde smeštaju ljude bez papira prije nego ih deportuju
a takođe i ljude čiji je slučaj nedefinisan.
Unutrašnji sistem je kao u klasičnom zatvoru ali po evropskim standardima,
sa kamerama, plazma televizorom, svake srede pranje veša… Kada smo
stigli morali smo da skinemo odeću, uzeli su nam kaiševe, telefone,
novac… Kada smo pitali šta će biti sa nama, rekli su da ćemo možda biti
deportovani za Srbiju nakon dve nedelje. Proverili su sve što smo imali od
dokaza kod sebe, srpske sim kartice, novac, fotografije u telefonu…
Prema zakonima u Bosni, ako nemaš nikakav dokaz odakle si ušao u zemlju,
ne mogu te deportovati, a to znači da ostaješ zatvoren na dugo vremena.
Pravila su takva da osoba pre nego što izadje odatle, mora da plati
troškove boravka za period koji je proveo u zatvoru. Rekli su nam da
svakog dana troše 30 eura na nas, pa su tako uzimali odredjenu svotu novca
od svakog, u zavisnosti koliko je novca osoba imala kod sebe. Npr. ako
ima 200 eura vratiće mu samo 20 evra, a ostalo će zadržati.
 
Ljudi koje sam tamo upoznao
 
Bili su sa nama četiri Sirijca sa malim dečakom, onu su bili u
odeljenju za porodice. Posle nekog vremena deportovali su ih za Srbiju.
Sreo sam i dva dečaka iz Pakistana, oni su bili tamo 3 meseca , u međuvremenu
zatražili su azil i posle su izašli u otvoreni kamp. Kasnije sam
ih ponovo sreo u Srbiji.Bila je tu i jedna starija žena iz Hrvatske, nije
imala papire kod sebe kada su je kontrolisali na ulici. Ne znam zašto je nisu
pustili nazad u njenu zemlju ili zašto je nisu pustili na slobodu. Ona
sigurno ne može biti opasna za društvo.
Bio je sa nama i jedan dečko iz Džibutija. On je imao sve papire, dobio je
vizu za Bosnu u Turskoj. Čim je sleteo, uhapsili su ga na aerodromu.
Doveli su ga u naš zatvor, ostao je sa nama dva dana a zatim su ga
deportovali nazad u Tursku.
I jedan pianista iz Maroka. Ovaj mladić je bio tamo već godinu i po dana.
On nam je ispričao priču o pobuni koja se desila prije. Jedna grupa zatvorenika
je u svom očaju polupala sve prozore i plazma TV i isekli su svoja tela
sa britvama. Posle 6 meseci njegovi drugari su pušteni. Njega nisu pustili
jer je bio optužen da je on bio glavni organizator te pobune.
 Najduže je bio zatvoren jedan stari čovek iz Iraka. Pet godina. 13 godina je
živeo u Bosni, žena mu je bila Bosanka i imao je sa njom decu. Ne znam zašto
je bio u zatvoru ali nisu ga uopšte vodili na sud za sve to vreme.
Bio je tu i jedan čovek iz Irana. Godinu i po dana unutra. Taj čovek je bio
izuzetno lepo vaspitan, puno je putovao ranije. Na tom mestu je poludeo.
Ponekad dva dana nije jeo. Kljukali su ga tabletama, uostalom kao i sve
ljude unutra. Nekad se smejao sam za sebe i jako se plašio policije. Kada je
izlazio iz sobe ponavljao je – hvala, hvala, hvala – i klanjao se
policiji. Čekao je da ga deportuju, bilo gde, ali to se nije desilo.
 
Posle 3 nedelje, videli smo da se ništa ne dešava. Pitali smo kada će nas
Deportovati. Jedna žena je rekla da će Srbija možda odbiti da nas primi
nazad i moramo ostati duže. Videli smo sve te ljude unutra koji su već dugo
bili tamo… Odlučili smo da započnemo štrajk glađu.
Još istoga dana smo odbili hranu koju su nam dali za ručak.
Prvo su nas ignorisali. Jednom dečaku iz Nigerije se slošilo, odneli su ga
kod lekara. Sledeći dan jedan čovek je došao da priča sa nama. Rekao je da
nemamo razloga da štrajkujemo, da je procedura takva da trebamo da čekamo 30
dana i da ne treba da se bunimo. Preporučio je da sačekamo 30 dana, a
posle toga da odlučimo da li želimo da nastavimo štrajk.
Osećao sam se odgovornim, znao sam da nismo dovoljno jaki da nastavimo
štrajk. Ne bi izdržali dugo. Nije nam preostalo drugo nego da verujemo toj
 
Posle 30 dana deportovali su nas.
Na granici pre nego što smo prešli reku, bosanska policija je kontaktirala
srpsku stranu. Dugo smo čekali. Ne znam koji je bio problem. U jednom
trenutku su nam rekli da će nas možda vratiti nazad u zatvor.
Posle čekanja ipak smo krenuli ka srpskoj strani. Bilo je čudno posmatrati
te policajce kako se pozdravljaju, različite uniforme, ista lica…
Predali su nas srpskoj policiji. Kada smo ušli u Srbiju ništa nisu
proveravali, nije postojala nikakva lista sa našim imenima. Bojali smo se
da će nas ponovo zatvoriti u Padinsku skelu i deportovati nazad u
Makedoniju. Ali imali smo sreće. Samo su nas pustili. I sada smo tu
odakle smo i krenuli.
 
Neki od naših drugara su ostali u zatvoru i još uvek su tamo. Zajedno su
nas uhvatili pa bi bilo logično da nas zajedno i deportuju. Iako imaju
dokaze da su ušli na bosansku teritoriju iz Srbije , rečeno im je da
srpske vlasti nisu potvrdile da ih imaju u evidenciji. Kada su nas
izvodili, jednom dečaku su rekli da on ostaje. Zamislite kakav je to
osećaj kada sve vaše drugove odvode ( iako deportacija nije nešto najbolje
što može da vam se desi)a vi ostajete sami, zatvoreni. I niko vam ne kaže
ništa, zašto ostajete. Naravno, bunio se. Kamere su svuda postavljene i zato
su ga izveli i tamo ga pretukli. Čuli smo njegov glas…
 
Danas smo zvali drugove koji su još unutra. Ponovo su započeli štrajk
glađu. Posle trećeg dana onaj isti čovek je došao i rekao im da prekinu i
da će biti deportovani posle 3 dana. Tri dana su prošla, ništa se nije
desilo…

 

 

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